Watercolor portrait of the hereditary Sachem of the Iroquois Confederacy and Chief of the Mohawk Nation
"King Hendrick" "Thoyanoguen" by Calvin Ashley, Jr. 58.4 x 46.7cm


This watercolor portrays the hereditary Sachem of the Iroquois Confederacy and Chief of the Mohawk Nation, King Hendrick. As can best be determined, Hendrick was born between 1680 and 1690. He attended the English Stockbridge School in Massachusetts and was a professed Christian.

Recognized not only among Native Americans as a leader of morality and justice, Hendrick was held in equal high esteem by the white traders of the Mohawk Valley. He was an aggressive advocate for Indian rights, and recognized early the evil havoc liquor could wreck among his people.

In concert with Sir William Johnson and the English, Hendrick played an active role in pushing the marauding French out of New York State and back into Canada during the French and Indian Wars. Well known both at home and abroad for his oratorical skills, Hendrick said of his comrades prior to the Battle of Lake George "If they fight they are too few, and if they are to be killed they are too many". Alas this proved prophetic when Hendrick's horse was shot out from under him during the battle and he was run through by a French bayonet and died in 1755.

The painting is the work of Calvin Ashley, Jr. a onetime resident of St. Johnsville.
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