GEOLOGY

START WITH SCIENCE KITS

Science Programs for Children Ages 4 and 5

 

Objectives

  • Students will develop an understanding of change over time.
  • Students will learn how fossils are evidence of the diversity of organisms developed over geologic history.
  • Students will develop an understanding of properties of Earth materials, such as water and gases.
  • Students will learn about the properties of rocks and soils, such s texture, color, and hardness.

Books : (In kit)

  • Geology Rocks! by Cindy Blobaum
  • Digging Up Dinosaurs by ALIKI
  • Monster Bones by Jacqui Bailey
  • Hands-On Earth Science for Elementary Grades by Phil Parratone

Equipment : (In kit)

  • 1 Bag fossil shark teeth
  • 24 Piece fossil collection (each in sealed bags)
  • 1 Mold – a – Saurus
  • 4 Pieces of Geode in a box
  • 24 Fossil molds (clear plastic)
  • 1 Rock Study Kit (15 rocks)
  • 1 Mineral Study Kit (15minerals)
  • Video: I Dig Fossils
  • Basic Fossil Kit

Bookmarks : (In kit)

Paper copies of the bookmark are included in the kit. PDF and JPEG copies are available here.

  • PDF – 4 bookmarks per page. Ready to print in color.
  • JPG – single high quality jpeg image.

Program

  • Objectives
    • Students will develop an understanding of change over time.
    • Students will learn how fossils are evidence of the diversity of organisms developed over geologic history.
    • Students will develop an understanding of properties of Earth materials, such as water and gases.
    • Students will learn about the properties of rocks and soils, such s texture, color, and hardness.
  • Introduction
    • Vocabulary
      • Fossil – the mark or remains of a plant or animal that lived thousands or millions of years ago. Fossils include leaves, shells or skeletons that were preserved after a plant or animal died.
      • Minerals – a substance taken from the earth, but was never alive.
      • Geology – the study of the earth, looking at how the earth was formed and how it changes.
      • Geologists – person who studies rocks, soils, mountins, rivers, oceans, caves and other parts of the earth.
      • Extinct – when every one of its kind has died. It may become extinct due to changes in its environment, either natural or man-made, or it just failed to produce any more offspring.
      • Igneous rocks – form when hot magma from the earth comes to the surface, cools and solidifies.
      • Sedimentary rocks – consist of materials that once were part of older rocks or of plants and animals. These usually accumulate in layers.
      • Metamorphic rocks – rock that has changed its appearance and sometimes its mineral composition, by extreme pressure or heat. Both sedimentary and igneous rocks can later become metamorphic rocks.
  • Program
    • Digging for fossils
      • Fill the trays with dirt.
      • Bury the shell fossils in the dirt for students to find. If the students are skilled enough to follow some directions, continue on from here in a more correct archeological manner of creating a grid for clear identification of location of the fossil discovery.
      • Use string to make a grid over the tray.
      • Draw a copy of the grid on the board or on paper.
      • Have students look through the dirt to find fossils.
      • Have the students mark on the board in which part of the grid they found fossils ( use an X or picture to mark the spot)
      • Use sheet to identify each of the specific fossils.
    • Create fossils
      • Dirt can be used to press into the dinosaur molds or footprint molds.
      • Look at them afterward to see how the finished “fossil” looks compared to the molds.
    • Examine fossils
      • Pass around the real fossils and have students guess what they are.
      • Have students guess if the fossils are of animals or plants.
      • Each fossil has a card describing what it really is. Use the cards as a basis for factual information on each fossil.
    • Examine minerals
      • Take a mineral out of the tray. Read its name and pass it around. Have students come up with a list of words to describe it. Use porcelain piece or nail for scratch test to see which is harder. Other objects can be used as well.
      • Could minerals be found when looking for fossils? (Yes, but not as a fossil.)
  • General
    • Thought Questions
      • Are all types of animals that were once living, still alive? (Dinosaurs, dodo bird, carrier pigeons)
      • How do we know that dinosaurs ever existed? (Fossils, bones)
      • Is a fossil the same as a bone? (No, a bone was living, a fossil is the mark left from the bone)
      • Are all rocks the same? (No. Sedimentary, metamorphic and igneous – each is formed in a different way)

Consumables

  • Trays
  • Dirt
  • String

Resource Books: (Contact your local library to borrow)

  • Blobaum, Cindy. Geology Rocks!: 50 Hands-On Activities To Explore The Earth. Williamson Publishing, 1999.
  • Russell, William. Rocks And Minerals. Rourke, 1994.
  • World Book. Fossils Of The World ( World Book’s Science & Nature Guides) World Book, 2005.

Evaluation

Please print this evaluation, complete it and return to MVLS in the SWS red envelope.

Topics | About the Kits | Lending Policy

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