NUTRITION

 

Objectives

  • Students will learn about healthy eating habits.
  • Students will learn about the 6 basic food groups and how they appear on the food pyramid.
  • Students will learn how different foods help their bodies grow in different ways.
  • Students will learn how fruits and vegetables grow.

Books : (In kit)

  • Eating The Alphabet by Lois Ehlert
  • Tommy At The Grocery Store by Bill Grossman
  • Pickin’ Peas by Margaret Read MacDonald

Equipment : (In kit)

  • Garden Game with Instructions
  • Clear Plastic Container with Blue Cover (contents listed on container)
  • 4 Large Bags of Assorted Plastic Food

Bookmarks : (In kit)

  • Paper copies of the bookmark are included in the kit. PDF and JPEG copies are available here.
    • PDF – 4 bookmarks per page. Ready to print in color.
    • JPG – single high quality jpeg image.

Program

  • Objectives
    • Students will learn about healthy eating habits.
    • Students will learn about the 6 basic food groups and how they appear on the food pyramid.
    • Students will learn how different foods help their bodies grow in different ways.
    • Students will learn how fruits and vegetables grow.
  • Introduction
    • Vocabulary:
      • Nutrition – is the science that deals with food and how the body uses it.
      • Calcium – is needed for bone development and growth. It is found in milk, yogurt, fish with bones and some dark green vegetables, such as broccoli.
      • Iron – helps the body produce energy. It is found in red meat, poultry, fish and beans.
      • Vitamin C – keeps gums healthy and protects against infection. Carrots, spinach, and other fruits and vegetables are high in vitamin A and C.
      • Vitamin A – is important for good vision and healthy skin.
      • Carbohydrates – provide quick energy.
      • Fiber – helps to absorb sugars and cholesterol and helps to remove wastes.
      • Food pyramid – a general guide that lets you choose a healthy diet that is right for you (numbers for 2-6 year olds).
        • Grains – (6 servings) Provide complex carbohydrates and important source of energy. They also provide B vitamins, minerals and fiber.
        • Meats – (2 servings) Animal foods are excellent sources of protein, iron, and zinc, as are beans, nuts and seeds.
        • Milk – (2 servings) Richest sources of Calcium. They also provide protein and vitamins.
        • Fruits – (2 servings) Rich source of vitamins, mostly vitamin C. They are low in fat and calories.
        • Vegetables – (3 servings) Provide vitamins (especially A and C), excellent sources of fiber and are naturaly low in fat.
        • Fats – (use sparingly) These foods provide calories, but little else nutritionally.
  • Program
    • Sort through foods and have students try to identify the food by name.
    • Discuss foods with the students and classify the foods into the six major food groups, discussing reasons for each choice.
    • Use the food for a sorting game. Divide the group into two teams. Each team shuld have 6 containers, one for each food group. Divide the food into two piles (make sure there are the same number of food items in each pile.) Now have each team work to sort the foods into the different categories. Points can be given for speed and accuracy.
    • As a group, discuss all the foods in a given food group. Do they have the same nutritional value? (Example: milk, chocolate milk, and ice cream). Why or why not? What differs? Sugar, fat, calorie content. In the grains, chocolate cake, white bread, brown rice? Fiber differs greatly, and also fat and calories.
    • Talk about portion size. hamburger vs. Big Mac. Ice cream — what does 1/2 cup (the recommended serving size) look like compared to a double scoop ice cream cone? A tablespoon of ketchup vs. a big blob.
    • Have students design a meal from the different foods, and tell if they think it is a balanced meal and why.
    • Garden Game: Game ideas are given in the flyer.
    • Regardless of the game, it is important that students recognize that different fruits and vegetables grow by different methods.
  • General
    Thought Questions:

    • Which food, an apple or a candy bar, is better and healthier for your body? Why?
    • What are some other foods in the grain group? Meat? Milk? Fruits? Vegetables? Fats?
    • Why are some of the foods in the grain group nutritious? Meat? Milk? Fruits? Vegetables? Fats?
    • What is your favorite food group? Why?
    • What if anything, do you consider before deciding what you want to or should eat?

Evaluation

Please print this evaluation, complete it and return to MVLS in the SWS red envelope.

Topics | About the Kits | Lending Policy

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