COLORS

START WITH SCIENCE KITS

Science Programs for Children Ages 4 and 5

Objectives

  • To introduce children to the primary colors: red, blue, and yellow.
  • To introduce children to secondary colors: green, orange, and purple.
  • To show color separation.
  • To allow exploration of color by mixing paints.

Books : (In kit)

  • Little Blue and Little Yellow by Leo Lionni
  • Mouse Paint by Ellen Stoll Walsh
  • Rainbow Crow by Nancy Van Laan

Equipment : (In kit)

  • Coffee Filters / filter paper
  •   1   Black Magic Marker (washable)
  •   3   White plastic trays. NOTE: Please make sure the paint discs are dried off when finished to encourage longevity of the colors.
  • 13  Paint discs
  • 54  Color paddles
  •   6   Boxes of Crayola classic markers (10 in each)
  •   6 Tubes of Finger Paint
  • 18   Aprons NOTE: The finger paint is washable, but if it is left to dry on the aprons or trays, it is difficult to wash off. Promptly applied water gets the paint out of clothing.
  • 18   Cookie sheets NOTE: Cookie sheets should be completely dried by towel or air before putting away to avoid rusting.
  • 12  Boxes of Crayola Crayons (8 count each)
  •   3  Boxes of LARGE Crayola Crayons (washable – 8 count)
  • 14 Wooden Sticks
  • 33 Colored Pencils
  •   2 Vis-a-vis Pens (Water Soluble)

Bookmarks : (In kit)

Paper copies of the bookmark are included in the kit. PDF and JPEG copies are available here.

  • PDF – 4 bookmarks per page. Ready to print in color.

Program

Objectives

  • To introduce children to the primary colors: red, blue, and yellow.
  • To introduce children to secondary colors: green, orange, and purple.
  • To show color separation.
  • To allow exploration of color by mixing paints.
  • Introduction
    • Look around – who is wearing primary colors? Blue? Yellow? Red?
    • What colors are secondary colors? Orange, Green and Purple
    • How can we make secondary colors from primary colors? Mix the primary colors to make the secondary colors.
  • Program 
    • Cut a piece of filter paper long enough to hang into a cup with a little water in it. The cup should only have an inch of water, as the water will “climb” the filter paper. With the vis-a-vis pen, draw a small “bird-like” line about 2″ from the top of the filter paper. Attach the filter paper to a pencil or something that will hold the paper over the cup, allowing only a very small portion of the filter paper into the water. (The “bird-like” line can be a wide V.)  Now READ: Rainbow Crow by Nancy Van Laan. This is a Native American story to explain about colors. You don’t have to read every word, you may certainly condense the story! When you finish, your black bird will have changed into a rainbow (see example) bird from the lightest to the darkest colors.
    • READ: Little Blue and Little Yellow by Leo Lionni.
    • Pass out the color paddles to show mixing of colors as in the book. NOTE: If there aren’t any bright lights in the room, this might not work well as a group activity. There are plenty of paddles (54) to hand around to let individuals try mixing colors.
    • READ: Mouse Paint by Ellen Stoll Walsh.
    • Show the mixing of colors: Smear a spot of blue finger paint on a piece of paper. Ask what color should you use to make green (or purple). If there is a bit of uncertainty try both and show what happens. Show how using more or less of a color affects the final color. Repeat the demonstration with the water colors cautioning not to use too much water or there won’t be enough color. Also show the techniques with markers.
    •  Put an apron on each child. Give a metal tray (cookie sheet) to each child. Give a piece of paper to each child, which should be kept on the tray. Let children choose whether to experiment with water colors or with finger paints. If time allows, let them do a second “painting” with the other type of paint.
  • General
    • Although most of the children knew what new color was made by mixing two primary colors, they had difficulty thinking in reverse when asked what colors should be used to make green.
    • This really is not as messy as may be assumed since the metal trays do curtail the spread of paint on the table and are easily washed. NOTE: They should be completely dried by towel or air before putting away to avoid rusting.
    • Many children will prefer the paint to the markers, but some may be squeamish about the paint mess. One caution with markers is that few children draw with marker colors one on top of the other, so they may draw a picture, but are less likely to experience the mixing of colors to create new colors.
    • The finger paint is washable, but if it is left to dry on the aprons or trays, it is difficult to wash off.  Promptly applied water gets the paint out of clothing.
    • It is best to have an adult or teen volunteer squeeze the finger paint out on the individual papers as colors are requested. A little bit goes a long way.
    • The water color paint discs are designed to fit in the white trays with the six holders. Please make sure the paint discs are dried off when finished to encourage longevity of the colors.

Evaluation

Please print this evaluation, complete it and return to MVLS in the SWS red envelope.

Topics | About the Kits | Lending Policy

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