FUN FOOD FACTS!

Objectives

  • Students will learn about healthy eating habits.
  • Students will learn about the 6 basic food groups and how they appear on the food pyramid.
  • Students will learn how different foods help their bodies grow in different ways.
  • Students will learn how fruits and vegetables grow.

Books : (In kit)

  • At The Supermarket by Anne Rockwell
  • Eating The Alphabet by Lois Ehlert
  • How Are You Peeling? by Saxton Freyman
  • I will Never Not Eat A Tomato by Lauren Child
  • Pancakes For Breakfast by Tomie dePaolo
  • Stone Soup by Marcia Brown
  • Tops And Bottoms by Janet Stevens

Equipment : (In kit)

  • 4 Large Bags of Assorted Plastic Food
  • 1 Copy of “Carrots For Every Bunny” story
  • 1 Felt/Flannel MyPlate.gov plus felt food
  • 1 Food Spinner Card Game
  • 1 Laminated Poster of Nutritional Pyramid
  • 1 Set of smooth stones for “Stone Soup
  • 1 Wooden Garden Game
  • 1 Wooden Garden Puzzle

Program Sheet

Consumables (To BE SUPPLIED BY YOU) * Optional
Very Large Soup Pot (If you don’t have a very large pot – for the large plastic vegetables – use the felt vegetables.)
Crayons, Markers, and/or Colored Pencils

Bookmarks : (In kit)
Paper copies of the bookmark are included in the kit.
PDF – 4 bookmarks per page. Ready to print in color.

Reproducibles

Evaluation

Program

  • Objectives
    • Students will learn about healthy eating habits.
    • Students will learn about the 6 basic food groups and how they appear on the food pyramid.
    • Students will learn how different foods help their bodies grow in different ways.
    • Students will learn how fruits and vegetables grow.
  • Vocabulary
    • Nutrition – is the science that deals with food and how the body uses it.
    • Calcium – is needed for bone development and growth. It is found in milk, yogurt, fish with bones and some dark green vegetables, such as broccoli.
    • Iron – helps the body produce energy. It is found in red meat, poultry, fish and beans.
    • Vitamin C – keeps gums healthy and protects against infection. Carrots, spinach, and other fruits and vegetables are high in vitamin A and C.
    • Vitamin A – is important for good vision and healthy skin.
    • Carbohydrates – provide quick energy.
    • Fiber – helps to absorb sugars and cholesterol and helps to remove wastes.
  •  Food Pyramid – a general guide that lets you choose a healthy diet that is right for you (numbers for 2-6 year olds).
    • Grains – (3-5 servings) Provide complex carbohydrates and important source of energy. They also provide B vitamins, minerals and fiber.
    • Meats – (2 servings) Animal foods are excellent sources of protein, iron, and zinc, as are beans, nuts and seeds.
    • Milk – (3 servings) Richest sources of Calcium. They also provide protein and vitamins.
    • Fruits and Vegetables – (5-7 servings) Rich source of vitamins, mostly vitamin C and A. They are low in fat and calories.
    • Fats – (use sparingly) These foods provide calories, but little else nutritionally.
  • Program
    • Read: Eating The Alphabet by Lois Ehlert. Put the pyramid up on a white board or felt board. (You can use tape to hold it up.) Use the large bags of foods with the students and classify the foods into the six major food groups, discussing reasons for each choice. There are so many choices, have fun with them. You may not want to use all four bags, but you can plan in advance what you think they will enjoy and what they may actually know. (You only need to use one or two bags. Rummage through them for all your food groups.) As you discuss, ask what they like, or have tasted. Feel free to pass out the different foods and have the children come up to the poster too see where it fits in the pyramid.
  • Activities
    • Hand out the MyPlate.gov worksheets and have the children color a plate for one meal. Let them take more or color more than one in the library.
    • Have the puzzles out, mixed up, and let them put them together.
    • Have paper plates out and the food, and let them fill up their plates for a meal or snack.
    • Let the children play with the felt figures.
    • Use the Food Spinner Card to play a fun food game. Have each child select a food group. Then have the children take turns spinning the spinner. If it lands on their food group, they may choose a piece of plastic food from their group. After 20 spins, the child with the most pieces of plastic food is declared the winner.
  • General
    Ask questions of the children about food choices: Which is better, n apple or ice cream? What is a good snack to have when you get hungry? Should you drink juice or water? Why?

Please print this evaluation, complete it and return to MVLS in the SWS red envelope.

Topics | About the Kits | Lending Policy

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